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Rosetta has captured a selfie of its shadow on comet 67P in what is the highest-resolution image to be taken by the probe.The image was taken during a Valentines Day flyby when Rosetta passed within just four miles (6 km) from the surface of the icy comet.As well as the crafts shadow, an alien glow is seen reflected onto the comet, which scientists believe is caused by a trick of the light from the sun.Scroll down for video 
Rosetta has captured a selfie of its shadow (bottom of image) on comet 67P in what is the highest-resolution image to be taken by the probe. The image was taken during a Valentines Day flyby when the Rosetta passed just four miles (6 km) from the surface of the icy comet.The glow causes the shadow to be fuzzy and somewhat larger than Rosetta itself, measuring approximately 65ft by 165 ft (20 by 50 metres).If the sun were farther away, the shadow would be sharp and almost exactly the same size as Rosetta, which is around 2 x 32 metres.
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However, even at 215 million miles (347 million km) from 67P/C-G on 14 February, the sun appeared as a disc about 0.2 degrees across.This is about 2.3 times smaller than on Earth – resulting in a fuzzy penumbra around the spacecrafts shadow.With Rosetta just four miles (6km) above the surface, the penumbra effect adds roughly 65ft (20 metres) to the spacecrafts dimensions, which 
This graphic shows the difference between how a sharp shadow is generated by a point source (left) and a fuzzy shadow by a diffuse source (right)
The view, which shows the detail in features down to 11cm, is of a region on the bottom of the comet. The OSIRIS narrow-angle camera image from the close flyby shown here in context with a NAVCAM imageIf you were standing on the surface with Rosetta high above you, there would be no place in the shadow where the entire sun would be blocked from view. The view, which shows the detail in features down to 11cm, is of a region on the bottom of the comet. Other images reveal boulders on the comets surface, as well as stunning details of the contrasting terrain, the European Space Agency said.The boulders in these images range in size from a few metres to a few tens of metres, and lay scattered across the comets surface.Images taken from this viewpoint are of high scientific value, says OSIRIS Principal Investigator Holger Sierks from the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research (MPS) in Germany. This kind of view is key for the study of grain sizes.  ROSETTA: THE STORY SO FAR  Esas Rosetta spacecraft launched on 2 March 2004 aboard an Ariane 5 rocket, on a mission to visit comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.It took more than ten years to reach the comet, and on the way it flew past Mars and two asteroids.On 6 August 2014 it entered orbit around the comet, beginning a series of complex manoeuvres to get the best views possible.On 12 November 2014 Rosetta successfully released a smaller vehicle it had carried called Philae. This small probe bounced twice on the surface before coming to rest.Although Philaes landing did not go as planned, it was still able to complete more than 90 per cent of the science it was intended to do before its main batteries died, sending the probe to sleep.The location of the lander is currently unknown. It is thought to be in partial shadow near a cliff but, as the comet approaches the sun, the additional light may charge its solar panels enough for the lander to wake up.Rosetta, meanwhile, is continuing its mission around the comet. 67P is approaching the sun and, by August this year, it is thought its activity will have dramatically increased.This will release much more ice, vapour and other materials from the surface – and Rosetta will be there to watch it all happen. 
This OSIRIS shape model is marked with the position of the narrow-angle camera field of view taken during the 14 February flyby
A four-image montage of Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko comprising images taken on 14 February 2015 during the first dedicated close flyby. This image set was taken at 10:32 GMT from a distance of 7.8 miles (12.6 km) from the comet centre. Using the surface distance, the image scale is 0.9 m/pixelThe closest approach took place at 12:41 GMT over the Imhotep region on the comets large lobe.Rosettas parting shot following the close flyby features the comets small lobe at the top of the image, with the larger lobe in the lower portion of the image set.As well as providing the opportunity to take close-up high-resolution images of the comet surface, flybys like this also allow Rosettas instruments to sample the innermost parts of the comets atmosphere, or coma.Rosetta is now moving out for a far view of the comet – it will reach a distance of about 160 miles (255km) from the comet centre tomorrow.Last month, Nasa said the structure of Comet 67P resembles ice cream.In an experiment, they found that while the exterior of a comet is encased in a hard, outer crust, the interior would mostly be fluffy ice.
Moment Rosetta probe landed on moving comet (related)
Rosettas parting shot following the close flyby features the comets small lobe at the top of the image, with the larger lobe in the lower portion of the image setA comet is like deep fried ice cream, said Dr Murthy Gudipati of Nasas Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, corresponding author of a recent study appearing in the Journal of Physical Chemistry.The crust is made of crystalline ice, while the interior is colder and more porous. The organics are like a final layer of chocolate on top.To come to the conclusion, astronomers used an icebox-like instrument nicknamed Himalaya.They showed that fluffy ice on the surface of a comet would crystallise and harden as the comet heads towards the sun and warms up.The composition of comets is important to understanding how they might have delivered water and organics to the young, hot Earth.New results from the Rosetta mission show that asteroids may have been the primary carriers of lifes ingredients; however, the debate is ongoing and comets may have played a role. 
New results from the Rosetta mission show that asteroids may have been the primary carriers of lifes ingredients; however, the debate is ongoing and comets may have played a role. This image set was taken at 4:32 GMT from a distance of 22 miles (35km)

Claims end be fight

Passengers experienced tense moments on board a KLM flight today after a small fire erupted inside an overhead compartment for hand luggage.A spokesman for the Dutch airline said the cause of the fire is under investigation, but a passenger claims it was sparked by a lithium ion battery inside a travellers bag.Flight attendants used an on-board fire extinguisher to put out the blaze which occurred moments after the plane landed in Bangkok at 10:40am local time.Previous
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‘After that all passengers and crew left the plane safely.’The spokesman said he is unable to comment on the possibility that the fire involved a lithium ion battery, as the investigation hasn’t reached a conclusion.
The KLM crew is being hailed for extinguishing the fire and preventing injury to passengers and employees
One of the planes passengers tweeted a video which showed a crew member extinguishing the fireOne of the passengers on flight KL875 recorded video as a flight attendant used a fire extinguisher to spray a smouldering bag as it sat on a seat in business class.A photo snapped moments earlier shows the crew spraying the bag while it was on fire in the overhead luggage bin.The passenger posted the video and photo on her Twitter account, @Accone, and wrote: ‘Well done @KLM for calm management of cabin fire on flight KL875 caused by a battery in a passenger’s carry-on luggage’.She added in a second tweet: ‘Take Lithium ion batteries in carry on! One caused a fire on our flight. It was immediately detected & extinguished; difficult in cargo.’
KLM said it is unable to comment on claims that the fire was sparked by a passengers lithium ion batteryThe KLM crew is being hailed for extinguishing the fire and preventing injury to passengers and employees.The spokesman for the Dutch airline said the plane will be inspected and any necessary repairs will be completed before it returns to service.KLM’s policy on lithium ion batteries mirrors that of other carriers around the world.Loose lithium ion batteries may only be carried in hand baggage, and each spare battery must be stored in the original packaging, or the battery contact points must be covered with tape to insulate them and packed in separate plastic bags.It permits the transport of object that are powered by lithium batteries, including mobile phones, laptop computers and tablet computers. Last week Boeing and other aircraft makers urged a ban on bulk lithium battery shipments on passenger planes, saying the threat of fires is ‘an unacceptable risk’.An industry group warned that current fire suppression systems on planes cannot extinguish a blaze involving bulk shipments of lithium ion or lithium metal batteries.

Risk exercising carolina

Obese women have a 40 per cent higher risk of developing at least seven types of cancer in their lifetimeObese women have a 40 per cent higher risk of developing at least seven types of cancer in their lifetime, according to research.These weight-related cancers include bowel, post-menopausal breast, gallbladder, womb, kidney, pancreatic and oesophageal types.Statistics released by Cancer Research UK show that obese women have around a one in four risk of developing a cancer linked to weight in their lifetime.In a group of 1,000 obese women, 274 will be diagnosed with a bodyweight-linked cancer in their lifetime, compared with 194 women diagnosed in a group of 1,000 healthy weight women.Approximately a quarter of women are classified as obese and it is estimated that 18,000 women develop cancer as a result of being overweight or obese each year.There are different ways that obesity could increase the risk of cancer.One possibility is that it is linked to the production of hormones by fat cells – especially oestrogen which is thought to fuel the disease. Around 12 per cent of postmenopausal breast cancers – a total of 5,269 women – are blamed on obesity. It is the highest number of cases linked to obesity because the cancer is so common.Last year a study found women were at double the risk of getting the disease because of their weight compared with men.Researchers said 8.2 per cent of all cancers in women in the UK were caused by being fat.The study found 4.4 per cent of all cancers in men were due to obesity. Previous estimates claimed if Britons continue to pile on the pounds, it will lead to almost 4,000 extra cancer cases a year by 2026.
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Dr Julie Sharp of Cancer Research UK said: Losing weight isnt easy, but you dont have to join a gym and run miles every day or give up your favourite food. Just making small changes that you can maintain in the long term can have a real impact. To get started, try getting off the bus a stop earlier and cutting down on fatty and sugary foods.
A quarter of women are classified as obese and it is estimated that 18,000 women develop cancer as a result of being overweight or obese each year
Rising obesity rates putting people at risk of cancer
Gradually build on these to achieve a healthier lifestyle that you can maintain. And find out about local services, which can provide help and support to make lifestyle changes. We know that our cancer risk depends on a combination of our genes, our environment and other aspects of our lives, many of which we can control – helping people understand how they can reduce their risk of developing cancer in the first place remains crucial in tackling the disease.Lifestyle changes – like not smoking, keeping a healthy weight, and cutting back on alcohol – are the big opportunities for us all to reduce our cancer risk. Making these changes is not a guarantee against cancer, but it stacks the odds in our favour.Breast cancer patients can raise their chances of survival by exercising, a study has found.Tumours grew more slowly when mice being treated for cancer had an exercise wheel in their cage. It means that in future, breast cancer patients could be prescribed exercise as part of their treatment.As cancers grow, the blood vessels supplying them with oxygen become thin and tangled, making it harder for drugs to reach the tumour.But when US researchers from the Duke Cancer Institute in North Carolina let mice with breast cancer run on wheels, their bloody supply improved. Researcher Dr Mark Dewhirst said: We were truly amazed by these findings.Macmillan Cancer Support has previously described exercise as a wonder drug.